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Art and Historic Preservation Resources

This guide provides resources for the study of art and historic preservation. It includes links to international, national, state and local sites, legal information, organizations and preservation of varied materials. It also includes art research help.

Supplies for Labeling

Something to write on and clips to stabilize tape; Tweezers & scissors; Gloves appropriate for object

Paper & Photos

● 2B Graphite pencil

Objects

● Sakura PIGMA pens

● Paraloid B-72 clear & opaque

● Japan paper

● Starch paste 

● Soft white nylon paint brush 3⁄8”

Textiles

● Cotton twill tape

● Tags with cotton string

● Cotton thread and needle

 

Labeling Considerations

Consider:

● The fragility of the item

● The label should be easily accessed

● A location that is inconspicuous while being displayed

● Consistent location

● Don’t block important information (if possible)

● When unsure (Paraloid Method and Paper Method) to label an object, choose Paper

● Practice writing clear, discernable numbers and letters

● No Sharpies or permanent markers

● Reversible

How to Remove or Erase a Label

2B Pencil

Use a high-polymer eraser found in most art/craft stores or online.

PIGMA archival pen

Use distilled water applied with a Q-Tip, and rub the lettering off gently. Blot area dry once clean.

Paraloid B-72 resin (top/bottom coating)

Apply mineral spirits in a well ventilated area with a Q-Tip and rub the coating gently until it is removed.

“Rince” using a Q-Tip and distilled water. Blot area dry.

Starch adhesive with japan paper

Use distilled water applied with a Q-Tip, then gently peel off with a pair of tweezers. You may apply the distilled water liberally, but not to the point where the label is dripping with excessive water. “Rince” using a Q-Tip and distilled water. Blot area dry.